Autistic Pride Day

Autistic Pride Day is a “celebration of the neurodiversity of people on the autism spectrum” to express pride in autism and understand it not as a “disease” but as a “difference.”
Autistic Pride Day, an Aspies for Freedom initiative, is a celebration of the neurodiversity of people on the autism spectrum on June 18 each year. Autistic pride recognises the innate potential in all people, including those on the autism spectrum.

In June, the organisations around the world celebrate Autistic Pride Day, with events around the world, to persuade "neuro-typicals", people not on the autism spectrum, that autistic people are "unique individuals" who should not be seen as cases for treatment.
Autistic pride asserts that autistic people have a unique set of characteristics that provide them many rewards and challenges. Although autism is an expression of neurodiversity, some people promoting Autistic pride believe that some of the difficulties that they experience are as the result of societal issues. For instance, campaigns to gain funding for autism related organizations promote feelings of pity. Researchers and people with high-functioning autism have contributed to a shift in attitudes away from the notion that autism is a deviation from the norm that must be treated or cured, and towards the view that autism is a difference rather than a disability. New Scientist magazine released an article entitled "Autistic and proud" on the first Autistic Pride Day that discussed the idea.

Autism
Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how a person communicates with, and relates to, other people. It also affects how they make sense of the world around them.
It is a spectrum condition, which means that, while all people with autism share certain difficulties, their condition will affect them in different ways. Some people with autism are able to live relatively independent lives but others may have accompanying learning disabilities and need a lifetime of specialist support. People with autism may also experience over- or under-sensitivity to sounds, touch, tastes, smells, light or colours.