- December 16 -

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party (referred to in its time simply as 'the destruction of the tea' or by other informal names and not celebrated until half a century later,) was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, a city in the British colony of Massachusetts, against the tax policy of the...

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party (referred to in its time simply as 'the destruction of the tea' or by other informal names and not celebrated until half a century later,) was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, a city in the British colony of Massachusetts, against the tax policy of the British government and the East India Company that controlled all the tea imported into the colonies. On December 16, 1773, after officials in Boston refused to return three shiploads of taxed tea to Britain, a group of colonists boarded the ships and destroyed the tea by throwing it into Boston Harbor. The incident remains an iconic event of American history, and other political protests often refer to it.

The Tea Party was the culmination of a resistance movement throughout British America against the Tea Act, which had been passed by the British Parliament in 1773. Colonists objected to the Tea Act because they believed that it violated their right to be taxed only by their own elected representatives. Protesters had successfully prevented the unloading of taxed tea in three other colonies, but in Boston, embattled Royal Governor Thomas Hutchinson refused to allow the tea to be returned to Britain. He apparently did not expect that the protesters would choose to destroy the tea rather than concede the authority of a legislature in which they were not directly represented.

The Boston Tea Party was a key event in the growth of the American Revolution. Parliament responded in 1774 with the Coercive Acts, or Intolerable Acts, which, among other provisions, closed Boston's commerce until the British East India Company had been repaid for the destroyed tea. Colonists in turn responded to the Coercive Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them. The crisis escalated, and the American Revolutionary War began near Boston in 1775.
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Tea_Party

Categories:

More holidays on this day:

Ludwig van Beethoven's Birthday

You may also like...

Interesting events from History category.

Loch Ness Monster sighted

Although accounts of an aquatic beast living in Scotland's Loch Ness date back 1,500 years, the modern legend of the Loch Ness Monster is born when a sighting makes local news on May 2, 1933. The newspaper Inverness Courier related an account of a local couple who claimed to have seen 'an enormous...

First Polish Legislative Election, 1989

The Polish legislative election of 1989 was the tenth election to the Sejm, the parliament of the People's Republic of Poland, and eleventh in Communist Poland. It took place on 4 June (first round) and 18 June (second round). Not all parliamentary seats were freely contested, but the...

Lidice Day

Anniversary of the razing of the village of Lidice and the massacre of its people by the Nazis on June 10, 1942, in revenge for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich by Czech agents of the Allies. Lidice Lidice is a village in the Czech Republic just northwest of...

Algeria Independence Day

July 5 is celebrated in Algeria as Independence Day, in remembrance of actual independence from France in 1962. After being taken by the French in 1830, Algeria remained under France’s control for 132 years. History Historical evidences state that since 10,000 BC, Berbers...

Belgian National Day

Belgium is an ancient and yet still young nation. Belgians were first mentioned about 2,000 years ago (by Julius Caesar in his book on the Gallic Wars). Nevertheless, Belgium was for centuries part of a larger state structure. The independant State of Belgium was born on October 4, 1830.

Berlin Wall Opened

Berlin had been politically divided since the end of World War II, with the eastern portion of the city serving as the capitol of German Democratic Republic. The two parts of the city were physically divided in 1961 with the construction of the Berlin Wall, the most visible expression of the Cold...

Download KeepIn Calendar

Enjoy the interesting stories even on your phone or tablet