- December 16 -

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party (referred to in its time simply as 'the destruction of the tea' or by other informal names and not celebrated until half a century later,) was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, a city in the British colony of Massachusetts, against the tax policy of the...

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party (referred to in its time simply as 'the destruction of the tea' or by other informal names and not celebrated until half a century later,) was a political protest by the Sons of Liberty in Boston, a city in the British colony of Massachusetts, against the tax policy of the British government and the East India Company that controlled all the tea imported into the colonies. On December 16, 1773, after officials in Boston refused to return three shiploads of taxed tea to Britain, a group of colonists boarded the ships and destroyed the tea by throwing it into Boston Harbor. The incident remains an iconic event of American history, and other political protests often refer to it.

The Tea Party was the culmination of a resistance movement throughout British America against the Tea Act, which had been passed by the British Parliament in 1773. Colonists objected to the Tea Act because they believed that it violated their right to be taxed only by their own elected representatives. Protesters had successfully prevented the unloading of taxed tea in three other colonies, but in Boston, embattled Royal Governor Thomas Hutchinson refused to allow the tea to be returned to Britain. He apparently did not expect that the protesters would choose to destroy the tea rather than concede the authority of a legislature in which they were not directly represented.

The Boston Tea Party was a key event in the growth of the American Revolution. Parliament responded in 1774 with the Coercive Acts, or Intolerable Acts, which, among other provisions, closed Boston's commerce until the British East India Company had been repaid for the destroyed tea. Colonists in turn responded to the Coercive Acts with additional acts of protest, and by convening the First Continental Congress, which petitioned the British monarch for repeal of the acts and coordinated colonial resistance to them. The crisis escalated, and the American Revolutionary War began near Boston in 1775.
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Tea_Party

Categories:

More holidays on this day:

Ludwig van Beethoven's Birthday

You may also like...

Interesting events from History category.

Bangladesh Independence Day

The Independence Day of Bangladesh, also referred to as 26 March, is a national holiday. It commemorates the country's declaration of independence from Pakistan in the late hours of 25 March 1971 by the "Father of the Nation" Bongobondhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman before he was arrested by Pakistani...

Everybody Draw Mohammed Day

Everybody Draw Mohammed Day was an event held on May 20, 2010 in support of free speech and freedom of artistic expression of those threatened with violence for drawing representations of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. It began as a protest against censorship of an American television show,...

Independence Day of Eritrea

The Independence Day of Eritrea is one of the most important public holidays in the country. It is observed on May 24 every year. On this day in 1991, Eritrean People's Liberation Front forces moved into the capital Asmara, reinstating independence, following a 30-year-long battle against the...

Boone Day

On June 7, 1769, frontiersman Daniel Boone first saw the forests and valleys of present-day Kentucky. Daniel Boone (November 2, 1734 – September 26, 1820) was an American pioneer, explorer, and frontiersman whose frontier exploits made him one of the first folk heroes of the United States....

Algeria Independence Day

July 5 is celebrated in Algeria as Independence Day, in remembrance of actual independence from France in 1962. After being taken by the French in 1830, Algeria remained under France’s control for 132 years. History Historical evidences state that since 10,000 BC, Berbers...

Women's Equality Day

Women's Equality Day is a day proclaimed each year by the United States President to commemorate the granting of the vote to women throughout the country on an equal basis with men. Women in the United States were granted the right to vote on August 26, 1920, when the 19th Amendment to the United...

Download KeepIn Calendar

Enjoy the interesting stories even on your phone or tablet