- March 17 -

St. Patrick's Day

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish...

St. Patrick's Day

Saint Patrick is the patron saint and national apostle of Ireland. St Patrick is credited with bringing christianity to Ireland. Most of what is known about him comes from his two works; the Confessio, a spiritual autobiography, and his Epistola, a denunciation of British mistreatment of Irish christians. Saint Patrick described himself as a 'most humble-minded man, pouring forth a continuous paean of thanks to his Maker for having chosen him as the instrument whereby multitudes who had worshipped idols and unclean things had become the people of God.'

Many folk ask the question 'Why is the Shamrock the National Flower of Ireland ?' The reason is that St. Patrick used it to explain the Holy Trinity to the pagans. Saint Patrick is believed to have been born in the late fourth century, and is often confused with Palladius, a bishop who was sent by Pope Celestine in 431 to be the first bishop to the Irish believers in Christ.

Saint Patrick is most known for driving the snakes from Ireland. It is true there are no snakes in Ireland, but there probably never have been - the island was separated from the rest of the continent at the end of the Ice Age. As in many old pagan religions, serpent symbols were common and often worshipped. Driving the snakes from Ireland was probably symbolic of putting an end to that pagan practice. While not the first to bring christianity to Ireland, it is Patrick who is said to have encountered the Druids at Tara and abolished their pagan rites. The story holds that he converted the warrior chiefs and princes, baptizing them and thousands of their subjects in the 'Holy Wells' that still bear this name.

There are several accounts of Saint Patrick's death. One says that Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on March 17, 460 A.D. His jawbone was preserved in a silver shrine and was often requested in times of childbirth, epileptic fits, and as a preservative against the 'evil eye.' Another account says that St. Patrick ended his days at Glastonbury, England and was buried there. The Chapel of St. Patrick still exists as part of Glastonbury Abbey. Today, many Catholic places of worship all around the world are named after St. Patrick, including cathedrals in New York and Dublin city

Why Saint Patrick's Day?
Saint Patrick's Day has come to be associated with everything Irish: anything green and gold, shamrocks and luck. Most importantly, to those who celebrate its intended meaning, St. Patrick's Day is a traditional day for spiritual renewal and offering prayers for missionaries worldwide.

So, why is it celebrated on March 17th? One theory is that that is the day that St. Patrick died. Since the holiday began in Ireland, it is believed that as the Irish spread out around the world, they took with them their history and celebrations. The biggest observance of all is, of course, in Ireland. With the exception of restaurants and pubs, almost all businesses close on March 17th. Being a religious holiday as well, many Irish attend mass, where March 17th is the traditional day for offering prayers for missionaries worldwide before the serious celebrating begins.

In American cities with a large Irish population, St. Patrick's Day is a very big deal. Big cities and small towns alike celebrate with parades, 'wearing of the green,' music and songs, Irish food and drink, and activities for kids such as crafts, coloring and games. Some communities even go so far as to dye rivers or streams green!
Source:
http://www.st-patricks-day.com/about_saintpatrick.html#sthash.iOCqmeFQ.dpuf

Categories:

You may also like...

Interesting events from Special category.

World Peace and Understanding Day

On 23 February 1905, was the very first Rotary meeting that Paul Harris, Gustavus Loehr, Silvester Schiele, and Hiram Shorey gathered at Loehr’s office in Room 711 of the Unity Building in downtown Chicago. The anniversary is known as “World Peace and Understanding Day.”

Kindergarten Day

Kindergarten Day celebrates birthday of Friedrich Fröbel who was born in 1782 and started the first kindergarten in 1837, in Germany. Despite being popular in Germany, the Prussian government outlawed the schools in 1851. Froebe died a year later and it wasn’t until 1860 that the...

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day

Quebec's National Holiday (French: La fete nationale) is a provincial public holiday celebrated annually on June 24, Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day. The festivities occur on June 23 and 24 and, since 1978, are publicly financed and organized by a National Holiday Organizing Committee (Comité...

SCUD Day (Savor the Comic, Unplug the Drama)

SCUD Day, or also known as Savor the Comic, Unplug the Drama Day, is a day for you to ditch the drama in your life and instead appreciate comedic value that life's issues bring. Life is only as serious as you make it and life is too short to go around stressed and downtrodden. Today’s...

Happiness Happens Day

Happiness Happens Day began in 1999 when the Secret Society of Happy People declared Aug. 8 to be Admit You're Happy Day. Though the day's name has changed since it first began, the holiday's mission remains the same: It's a day dedicated to happiness and to the optimism that can make it...

International Students' Day

International Students' Day is an international observance of student community, held annually on November 17. Taking the day differently than its original meaning, a number of universities mark it, sometimes on a day other than November 17, for a nonpolitical celebration of the multiculturalism of...

Download KeepIn Calendar

Enjoy the interesting stories even on your phone or tablet