International Mother Earth Day

Mother Earth is a common expression for the planet Earth in a number of countries and regions, which reflects the interdependence that exists among human beings, other living species and the planet. For instance, Bolivians call Mother Earth Pachamama and Nicaraguans refer to her as Tonantzin.

The proclamation of 22 April as International Mother Earth Day is an acknowledgement that the Earth and its ecosystems provide its inhabitants with life and sustenance. It also recognizes a collective responsibility, as called for in the 1992 Rio Declaration, to promote harmony with nature and the Earth to achieve a just balance among the economic, social and environmental needs of present and future generations of humanity.

International Mother Earth Day (also known simply as Earth Day) recognises that the Earth and its ecosystems provide its inhabitants with life and sustenance. It also aims to raise awareness that humans have a collective responsibility to promote harmony with nature and to balance the economic, social and environmental needs of present and future generations.

'Mother Earth' is an ancient concept common to many languages and cultures, acknowledging our connection to the planet which sustains and nurtures us. Names include Pachamama (Andean culture), Terra (Ancient Rome) and Gaia (Ancient Greece). Gaia has also been used to name a theory (Gaia hypothesis) that life on Earth is organised into a complex a self-regulating system.

You could use International Mother Earth Day as a prompt to explore these concepts or simply to reflect on how our planet nurtures us and how we can care for it in return.